Businesses all over the world are seemingly keen to harness the power of wholesale LED panels and other such products, with more than 40 stakeholder groups pledging six billion LED lighting products and shipping more than 100 million bulbs around the world since the launch of the Global Lighting Challenge in 2015.

The Challenge itself was launched at the COP21 climate conference held in Paris last year by The Clean Energy Ministerial, in a bid to promote energy-efficient lighting and to inspire both public and private sector leaders to deploy high efficiency and high quality lighting products around the world.

Partner of the Challenge, The Climate Group, is pushing for all public lighting across the globe to be LED (or as energy efficient) by the year 2025.

“In the wake of the historic Paris Agreement, the tools to achieve real climate action – in a way that makes real economic sense – are ready and waiting for governments and businesses to use them. LED street lighting is an obvious example of a low carbon solution that is available now, is technically proven and commercially attractive. There is no real excuse not to switch,” chief executive of The Climate Group Mark Kenber said.

A few years ago, The Climate Group launched its LightSavers scheme that saw LED street lighting trialled in 12 cities around the world and early adopters of the initiative have already seen big energy savings as well as environmental benefits from making the move to LEDs.

Adelaide, for example, saw a 20 per cent drop in carbon emissions, as well as a 28 per cent economic growth, between 1990 and 2013. The city has now pledged to become the first carbon neutral city anywhere by the year 2025.